Accountable Care Organizations During Covid-19: Routine Care for Older Adults with Multiple Chronic Conditions

Adam Beckman, BS
Department of Medicine
Division of Health Policy
Poster Overview

The COVID-19 pandemic threatens the health and well-being of older adults with multiple chronic conditions. To date, limited information exists about how Accountable Care Organizations (ACOs) are adapting to manage these patients. We surveyed ACOs participating in the Medicare Shared Savings Program (MSSP) as of May 2020 about their concerns for these patients during the pandemic and strategies they are employing to address them. The survey was completed by 67 respondents representing 78 ACOs of 517 ACOs (15%) including all 4 US regions. ACOs expressed some or great concern about disruptions to necessary care for this population, including the accessibility of social services (97%) and long-term care services (88%). While certain strategies like virtual primary and specialty care visits were being used by nearly all ACOs, other services such as virtual social services, home medication delivery, and remote lab monitoring were far less commonly accessible. ACOs expressed that support for telehealth services, investment in remote monitoring capabilities, and funding for new, targeted care innovation initiatives would help them better care for vulnerable patients during this pandemic.

Scientific Abstract

The COVID-19 pandemic threatens the health and well-being of older adults with multiple chronic conditions. To date, limited information exists about how Accountable Care Organizations (ACOs) are adapting to manage these patients. We surveyed ACOs participating in the Medicare Shared Savings Program (MSSP) as of May 2020 about their concerns for these patients during the pandemic and strategies they are employing to address them. The survey was completed by 67 respondents representing 78 ACOs of 517 ACOs (15%) including all 4 US regions. ACOs expressed some or great concern about disruptions to necessary care for this population, including the accessibility of social services (97%) and long-term care services (88%). While certain strategies like virtual primary and specialty care visits were being used by nearly all ACOs, other services such as virtual social services, home medication delivery, and remote lab monitoring were far less commonly accessible. ACOs expressed that support for telehealth services, investment in remote monitoring capabilities, and funding for new, targeted care innovation initiatives would help them better care for vulnerable patients during this pandemic.

Clinical Implications
We need greater investment for primary care organizations to invest in telehealth services and to launch initiatives caring for vulnerable patients during the pandemic.
Research Areas
Authors
Adam L. Beckman BS, Robert E. Mechanic MBA, Tanya B. Shah MBA MPH, Jose F. Figueroa MD MPH
Principal Investigator
Jose F. Figueroa MD MPH

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