Motion artifacts of food-cue fMRI in states of hunger and satiety: Impact of age and clinical status

Avery Van De Water, BS
Department of Medicine
Division of Women’s Health
Poster Overview

Background: Food-cue functional magnetic resonance imaging tasks allow us to explore different reward processes and appetite. Appetitive state (fed vs fasted) is often different between and within studies using food-cue tasks. The motion of participants while in the scanner is known to impact the group-level activation patterns. It is unknown if appetitive state affects a participant’s motion while in the scanner. An individual’s motion in different appetitive states may be further impacted by their age and clinical status.

Methods: 116 females participated in this study: 78 subjects with low-weight eating disorders (LWED) and 38 healthy controls (HC). Participants completed an overnight fast before their scanning visit. After the first food-cue task, participants consumed a meal before repeating the task. The food-cue task consists of 5 runs, each showing food-neutral and food-related images. Movement data for participants’ scans in fed and fasted states were extracted. Within groups, we tested whether the effect of appetitive state on motion is significant and whether the effect depends on age.

Results: In HC, there was an interaction between appetitive state and age (p=0.06): younger individuals had greater motion in the fed state. In LWED, there was no interaction between appetitive state and age (p=0.51).

Scientific Abstract

Background: Food-cue functional MRI paradigms allow us to explore homeostatic and hedonic reward processes and appetite. Appetitive state (fed vs fasted) is often varied between and within studies using food-cue tasks. Participant motion is known to impact group-level BOLD activation patterns. It is unknown if appetitive state affects in-scanner motion. Participant motion in varied appetitive states may be further impacted by age and clinical status.

Methods: 116 females participated in this study: 78 subjects with low-weight eating disorders (LWED) and 38 healthy controls (HC). Participants completed a 14-h fast before arriving to the scanning visit. After the first food-cue block paradigm, participants consumed a standardized meal before repeating the paradigm. During the food-cue paradigm, 5 runs were collected with 120 food-neutral and food-related images shown per run. The data was preprocessed using SPM12. Motion artifact data parameters were extracted using Artifact Detection Tools. Within groups, we tested whether the effect of state is significant and whether the effect depends on age using an ANCOVA.

Results: In HC, there was an interaction between appetitive state and age (p=0.06): younger individuals had greater motion artifacts in the fed state. In LWED, there was no significant interaction between appetitive state and age (p=0.51).

Clinical Implications
Considering the potential impact of individual in-scanner motion on group-level modeling of activation and connectivity patterns, studies in which participants are scanned after a meal should adjust for individual differences in motion, with particular attention to age and clinical status.
Research Areas
Authors
Avery L. Van De Water, Lauren Breithaupt, Kendra R. Becker, Kamryn T. Eddy, Madhusmita Misra, Elizabeth A. Lawson, Jennifer J. Thomas, and Laura M. Holsen
Principal Investigator
Laura Holsen

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