Pilot of a Nurse-Driven Ambulatory Center for Breastfeeding at Brigham and Women's Hospital

Jennifer Riley, MSN
Department of Nursing
Division of Lactation Support Services
Poster Overview

Background and Significance

The Lactation Support Services team at Brigham and Women’s Hospital identified a gap in ambulatory postpartum breastfeeding support after hospital discharge in the greater Boston community. With support from nursing and hospital leadership the Center for Breastfeeding was established in fall 2019.

 

Methods

Between June and October of 2019, a business proposal was submitted to administration and accepted and space to house the clinic was identified. An interdisciplinary committee was formed to guide the process. Site visits to existing clinics in the area were completed, and input from other breastfeeding centers was solicited nationally. Departments involved included IS, Pediatric Newborn Medicine, Obstetrics, and Nursing Administration.

 

Results

Since its inception, over 350 in-person and virtual lactation visits have occurred with an average insurance reimbursement of $190 per consult. Post-visit surveys reflect high satisfaction rates with follow-up support leading to a higher incidence of successful breastfeeding outcomes.

 

Conclusion

Providing families with the ability to continue their breastfeeding care with the Brigham and Women’s Lactation Support Services team has led to improved continuity of care, high patient satisfaction after discharge, and greater breastfeeding success. Potential next steps include increasing clinic days, offering other locations, and follow-up phone calls and warmline support.

Scientific Abstract

Background and Significance

The Lactation Support Services team at Brigham and Women’s Hospital identified a gap in ambulatory postpartum breastfeeding support after hospital discharge in the greater Boston community. With support from nursing and hospital leadership the Center for Breastfeeding was established in fall 2019.

 

Methods

Between June and October of 2019, a business proposal was submitted to administration and accepted and space to house the clinic was identified. An interdisciplinary committee was formed to guide the process. Site visits to existing clinics in the area were completed, and input from other breastfeeding centers was solicited nationally. Departments involved included IS, Pediatric Newborn Medicine, Obstetrics, and Nursing Administration.

 

Results

Since its inception, over 350 in-person and virtual lactation visits have occurred with an average insurance reimbursement of $190 per consult. Post-visit surveys reflect high satisfaction rates with follow-up support leading to a higher incidence of successful breastfeeding outcomes.

 

Conclusion

Providing families with the ability to continue their breastfeeding care with the Brigham and Women’s Lactation Support Services team has led to improved continuity of care, high patient satisfaction after discharge, and greater breastfeeding success. Potential next steps include increasing clinic days, offering other locations, and follow-up phone calls and warmline support.

Clinical Implications
Most parents plan to breastfeed but lack the support to reach their goals. Achieving the Healthy People 2030 breastfeeding goals will require ongoing development of outpatient lactation support for families, which in turn promotes improved local and global health outcomes.
Research Areas
Authors
Jennifer Riley MSN, RN, IBCLC and Susan Bryant MSN, RN, IBCLC
Principal Investigator
Jennifer Riley

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