A Detailed Characterization of the US Dermatology Medicare Physician Workforce

William Murphy, AB
Department of Dermatology
Poster Overview

Introduction:

Understanding who is currently practicing in dermatology is important to projecting future workforce needs for an understaffed specialty and ensuring equity among patients and physicians.

 

Methods:

We used publicly available databases to define characteristics of currently practicing Medicare dermatologists

 

Results:

Dermatologists are more likely to be female (50.0% vs 32.0%), more likely to own their own business (19.6% vs. 13.6%), less likely to practice outside of cities (8.8% vs 14.7%), and less likely to be affiliated with an academic hospital (26.1% vs 51.4%) than other medical providers. Dermatologists from older graduation cohorts are more likely to be male, own their own business, and not affiliated with an academic hospital than newer graduates. Graduates of public medical schools are more likely to practice outside of cities than other dermatologists.

 

Conclusions:

The dermatology workforce differs from other specialties. Graduation year and the medical school a dermatologist attended are associated with who they are, where they practice, and how they practice. Understanding these factors is important for policymakers in shaping the future workforce of dermatology.

Scientific Abstract

Introduction:

The age, gender, practice location, and medical training of the current dermatology workforce is of great interest to patients, providers, residency programs, and policymakers. Understanding characteristics of the current workforce, and medical school training programs can aid in plans for diversification within the field.

 

Methods:

The following publicly available government databases were utilized: Physician Compare File, Inpatient Prospective Payment System, National Plan and Provider Enumeration System

 

Results:

Dermatologists are more likely to be female (50.0% vs 32.0%), more likely to be sole proprietors (19.6% vs. 13.6%), less likely to practice in a rural setting (8.8% vs 14.7%), and less likely to be affiliated with an academic hospital (26.1% vs 51.4%) than other medical providers.

Dermatologists from older graduation cohorts are more likely to be male, sole practitioners, and not affiliated with an academic hospital than newer graduates. Graduates of public medical schools are more likely to practice in rural settings than other dermatologists.

 

Conclusions:

The dermatology workforce differs from other specialties. Within dermatologists, graduation year and medical school are associated with significant differences in practice patterns. Given the close interplay between access to dermatologic care and outcomes, policymakers should consider these characteristics as they shape the future workforce.

Clinical Implications
The ongoing shortage of dermatologists in the United States must be considered in light of the characteristics of current practicing dermatologists, and trends observed among the more recent graduates.
Research Areas
Authors
Murphy, W AB*,1,2,3 Pahalyants, V BA*,1,2,3 Gunasekera, N M.D.,M.B.A,1 Shi, C M.D.,1 Nambudiri, V M.D.,M.B.A,1 1 Brigham and Womens Hospital, Department of Dermatology 2 Harvard Medical School 3 Harvard Business School
Principal Investigator
Vinod Nambudiri MD, MBA

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