A Multi-Site Assessment of Patient Experience with Teledermatology

Principal Investigator: Paul Reicherter

Authors: Christy Nwankwo BA, Jessica Ferguson BS, Bao Vincent Ho BS
Lay Abstract

Due to increasing improvements with telemedicine and persistence of COVID-19 variants, telemedicine continues to be an appropriate tool for usage. It is important to discern if factors influencing patient satisfaction with telemedicine differ depending on specific patient populations. The purpose of this study is to examine patient satisfaction with telemedicine for a dermatology appointment. For this study, we issued a survey to patients seen at two academic dermatology clinics in Kansas City. Overall, 73.4% of patients reported being very satisfied or satisfied with their visit. Still, only 39% of participants were likely to choose a video over an in-person visit. Concerns with provider understanding, privacy, and inadequate care were the primary reasons for unsatisfactory visits. Of individuals reporting an income level of $20,000 or less, 75% used a phone for a video visit. In contrast to individuals with an income level over $100,000 where only 25% reported using a phone and the rest using a tablet, computer, or laptop. This study assesses patient satisfaction with teledermatology between two sites in geographical proximity which allows us to better understand views on satisfaction unbiased by provider or hospital satisfaction.

Scientific Abstract

Due to increasing efficacy of telemedicine and persistence of COVID-19 variants, telemedicine continues to be an appropriate tool for usage. It is important to discern if factors influencing patient satisfaction with telemedicine differ depending on specific patient populations. The purpose of this study is to examine patient satisfaction with telemedicine for a dermatology appointment. For this study, we issued a cross- sectional survey to patients seen at two academic dermatology clinics in Kansas City. Overall, 73.4% of patients reported being very satisfied or satisfied with their visit. Still, only 39% of participants were likely to choose a video over an in-person visit. Concerns with provider understanding, privacy, and inadequate care were the primary reasons for unsatisfactory visits. Of individuals reporting an income level of $20,000 or less, 75% used a phone for a video visit. In contrast to individuals with an income level over $100,000 where only 25% reported using a phone and the rest using a tablet, computer, or laptop. This study assesses patient satisfaction with teledermatology between two sites in geographical proximity which allows us to better understand views on satisfaction unbiased by provider or hospital satisfaction.

Clinical Implications
This study assesses patient satisfaction with teledermatology between two sites in proximity allowing us to better understand views on satisfaction unbiased by provider or hospital satisfaction. Future research should assess reasons for limited usage of telemedicine by minority racial groups.

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